Clayton’s Story

May 15, 2009

Unfortunately, I can’t figure out how to embed this 6.5 minute film in the blog. It’s moving, and a great check on our life perspective. Watch it here.

Clayton's-Obituary

For more about Clayton, including his obituary and a video of his memorial service, click here.

~Donovan

HT: Justin Taylor

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Do you know Him?

April 14, 2009

This is from a sermon entitled, “That’s My King”, delivered in 1976 by Dr. S. M. Lockridge (1913-2000). It’s powerful:

It’s wonderful to know this King. Wonderful! Do you know Him?

~Donovan

HT: Justin Taylor

Sunday’s Comin!

April 10, 2009

 

Good Friday is “good” because Sunday came. Jesus IS risen! He is risen indeed!!

~Donovan

HT: Mark Spicer

That’s Easter

April 8, 2009

These two short (less than 5 minute) videos are very well done. One of them addresses evidence for the resurrection, and the other addresses the significance of Easter in Christianity. Check them out here.

~Donovan

HT: Justin Taylor

Matt Chandler gave this illustration in his message at a recent Desiring God conference:

The gospel is beautiful, isn’t it?

~Donovan

HT: Justin Taylor

     
From an essay by D.A. Carson on “The Biblical Gospel” (in For Such a Time as This: Perspectives on Evangelicalism, Past, Present and Future, ed. Steve Brady and Harold Rowdon [London: Evangelical Alliance, 1986], p. 83):

Pundits have often noted that many in the Western world have become single-issue people. The church is not immune from such influences. The result is that many Christians assume the gospel (often, regrettably, some form of the ‘simple gospel’) but are passionate about something on the relative periphery: abortion, poverty, forms of worship, cultural decay, ecology, overpopulation, pornography, family breakdown, and much more. By labelling these complex subjects ‘relatively peripheral’ I open myself to attack from as many quarters as there are subjects on the list. For example, some of those whose every thought is shaded green will not be convinced that the ecological problems we face are peripheral to human survival. But I remain quite unrepentant. From a biblical-theological perspective, these challenges, as serious as they are, are reflections of the still deeper problem—our odious alienation from God. If we tackle these problems without tackling what is central, we are merely playing around with symptoms. This is no excuse for Christians not to get involved in these and many other issues. But it is to insist that where we get involved in such issues, many of which are explicitly laid upon us in scripture, we do so from the centre out, ie beginning with full-orbed gospel proclamation and witness and passion, and then, while acknowledging that no one can do everything, doing our ‘significant something’ to address the wretched entailments of sin in our world. The good news of Jesus Christ will never allow us to be smug and other-worldly in the face of suffering and evil. But what does it profit us to save the world from smog and damn our own souls? There are lots of ways of getting rid of pornography. For instance, one does not find much smut in Saudi Arabia. But one doesn’t find much of the gospel there, either.

The point is that in all our efforts to address painful and complex societal problems, we must do so from the centre, out of a profound passion for the gospel. This is for us both a creedal necessity and a strategic choice. It is a creedal necessity because this gospel alone prepares men and women for eternity, for meeting our Maker—and all problems are relativized in the contemplation of the cross, the final judgement, and eternity. It is a strategic choice because we are persuaded that the gospel, comprehensively preached in the power of the Spirit, will do more to transform men and women, not least their attitudes, than anything else in the world.

HT: Justin Taylor

In a similar vein, Carson makes these comments in “Basics for Believers: An Exposition of Philippians” [Grand Rapids, MI, Baker Academic], pp26-27:
                         
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John Piper writes about God’s providence in “the miracle on the Hudson” and “the miracle in the White House”. This is powerful! And beautiful. Please take the time to read it. Click here.

~Donovan

HT: Justin Taylor

This is the second poem Jonathan shared at our Coffeehouse a few weeks ago:

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D.A. Carson is one of my favorite Bible teachers – I’ve been greatly blessed by both his sermons and his commentaries and other books. I was excited when Memoirs of an Ordinary Pastor: The Life and Reflections of Tom Carson was published at the beginning of this year… I’d heard or read Carson refer to his father several times, and each time the picture painted was a beautiful one of faithfulness, of true godliness. I just finished the book – I read it in less than a week, so wrapped up in it that I only put it down when I had to. It was a huge blessing to read! (and moved me to tears several times) I’ll share a few highlights from the book in later posts, but for now, here’s one reference Carson made to his father in another book, A Call to Spiritual Reformation: Priorities from Paul and His Prayers , pp25-26:

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Bethel Grace hosted The Cave: a Coffee House experience, a few weeks ago. Jonathan Seruyange, a friend of Mark and Kim Spicer, was one of the performers. His poetry blessed me greatly, so I asked him if I could share it on our blog. He graciously agreed. I’ll post the second poem he shared with us later this week. Here is the first:     

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